Diabetes Diet: Does Eating Meat and Dairy Products Increase the Risk of Diabetes? Experts Expose

Studies have shown that people who eat foods that are characterized by excessive consumption of vegetables, fruits, and whole grains show a reduced risk of diabetes.

 Diabetes Diet: Does Eating Meat and Dairy Products Increase the Risk of Diabetes? Experts Expose

Diabetes is a chronic and debilitating disorder that affects people in many ways. Problems associated with diabetes affect both quality of life and longevity. Patients experience an increased risk of heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, vision loss, neuropathies amputated limbs and limbs. Prevention and treatment of diabetes are more important today than ever before. During the current epidemic, we are looking at an increased risk of both major complications and deaths in patients with COVID-19 with diabetes mellitus.

In more recent times, the rise of type 2 diabetes has become an uncontrollable force, worldwide. In 2019, 463 million people are estimated to be living with diabetes according to a study conducted on international and regional diabetes estimates by the International Diabetes Federation. India is among the top three countries with the highest number of people living with diabetes - 77 million people by 2019. By 2030, that number is expected to rise to over 100 million.


Can Incorporating Meat and Dairy in Daily Diet Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

The answer to that question is yes! Eating too much meat and milk can increase your risk of diabetes.

According to the World Health Organization, type 2 diabetes is primarily caused by a sedentary lifestyle and an excessive diet of animal fat and cholesterol. High consumption of red and processed meats, dairy products and sweets is associated with an increased risk of diabetes, obesity, exercise, age, or family history. This risk increases significantly among those who are overweight, which is also associated with an increase in meat and milk intake. One study that followed a 17-year eating habits found that having just one meal a week increased the risk of diabetes. 

The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition has published another study discussing the effect of red meat (beef, pork, mutton, veal, etc.) and milk on insulin and sugar. Studies have shown that meat, milk, and sugary foods, when eaten over a long period of time, affect blood sugar, metabolism, and body fat accumulation.

Our evolutionary history shows that humans developed specialized mechanisms for survival, especially when food was scarce - one of which was to store fat in their bodies. Although we live in a different world today, we continue to eat foods rich in fat, sugar, and cholesterol - foods linked to the risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and obesity. 

High levels of fat in the blood can block genes that help the body burn fat to create greater fat accumulation in muscle cells. This slows down the body's ability to burn more fat, while also promoting insulin resistance. One large study, called the Nurses' Health Study, showed a 100-fold increased risk of diabetes over 14 years for nurses with moderate weight (BMI> 35 kg / m2) compared with those with normal weight (BMI <22 kg / m2). ).

Excessive distribution of adipose tissue is another important factor in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Visceral fat rather than subcutaneous or retroperitoneal fat looks critical here. Insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes are very high in those with abdominal obesity, as measured by waist circumference or waist circumference to waist circumference.

Used animal meat contains many sodium and additives such as nitrates, nitrites, and nitrosamine and heme iron which are also associated with increased risk of disease. These antibodies and supplements found in processed meat can damage the insulin-producing organ, the pancreas.

Does Plant Foods Prevent Diabetes? Studies have shown that people who eat foods that are characterized by excessive consumption of vegetables, fruits, and whole grains show a reduced risk of diabetes. In a controlled clinical study, published by the British Diabetic Association, the low-calorie vegetable intake was found to be the best way to control diabetes. Studies have shown that vegetarian diets combined with exercise help improve insulin sensitivity and increase visceral fat loss.

The benefits of plant-based diets include promoting healthy weight loss, increased fiber, and phytonutrients, and improved insulin resistance. Modification of obesity reduces the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and, in patients with pre-existing disease, improves glycemic control.


Here's how to switch to a healthy, plant-based diet:

There are many ways to get to the plants. Add more vegetables

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